At Monadnock, Niederauer used the same car as she does normally at Mountain Speedway.

“Same car, but different muffler because they do not have a muffler rules there.”
We asked Niederauer how she felt being the first woman to drive in the TVMS

“If they can do it so can I!” was her response.

Unfortunately, Niederauer had to pack up and go home after spinning twice and then getting a front right flat tire when she was caught up in a restart pileup during the second heat race.


BAD NIGHT AT THE TRACK FOR EVONSION

After a strong third place finish at Waterford, Dale Evonsion in the black #35 car had to pack the car up on the trailer and head home from Monadnock Speedway.

TRUE VALUE MODS LEFTOVERS: MONADNOCK  by Denise DuPont
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IF THEY CAN DO IT, SHE CAN DO IT

Marisa Niederauer, a 20-year old from Plainedge, NY brought her #74 car to Monadnock.  She was the first female modified driver to join the TVMS racing division since the tour got started less than three season ago. 
While Niederauer might be new to TVMRS, she isn’t new to racing by any stretch of the imagination.  She drives her #74 weekly at Mountain Speedway (PA) and won the track’s hard charger award last season.  She got her start in racing at age eight when she started running karts.

“I am here because I race weekly at Mountain Speedway in Northeastern Pennsylvania,” said Niederauer. “I had a week off and I came here to get more race experience. I am just feeling the track and car out. I have a new carburetor on the car with more power.”

Will Niederauer be joining the TVMRS more this season?

“Right now I am running 10th in points at Mountain Speedway so. We will have to see what goes on. I like traveling so we will see what happens. If I do well I will want to continue with the series.”




Evonsion's car left the Monadnock pavement on the hook.
Seuss turned his luck around at Monadnock.  He started deep in the pack, but survived
a caution-healthy race to finish seventh.

“That was definitely a lot better then Waterford,” said Seuss. “We are happy to come out with a finish in the top-10 car in one piece for the most part.  We no doubt dodged some serious wrecks that happened around us.  I am glad that we were not part of that.  The car could have been a lot better, though.”

Seuss battled brake problems throughout the 100-lap feature.

Marisa Niederauer.  (Jim DuPont Photos)
“The chassis was good but there was something wrong with our brakes the whole time and the fronts were just locking up. I don’t know if the fronts were sticking and the rears just not working. I just could not drive it in where I needed to be able to drive it in to run with those guys.

“We will take it. We will build on it. We will fix our brakes and head to Lee next week.”



“In my heat race, the #51 of Jim Boniface did not know I was outside of him and he came up on the track,” said Evonsion.  “He hit my left front which broke a power steering belt, so we had to change that and we noticed there was a bent tie rod at the same time. We put a new one on right out of the box and for some reason it decided to pull the threads out of it when we were going out for the warm up laps for the consi race.

“We are unfortunately packing up and going home. After a good week last week where we moved up to six spots in the points, this week we may move down twelve spots after not making the race.”

Jeff Zuidema in Victory Lane
As they packed up the car, Dale felt just as bad for his team and sponsors who got him to the track as he did himself.

“I really want to thank the guys who helped me today, Teddy Bear Pools, Four Season Refrigeration, Ryans Oil and Mark without them I would not have made it this far. I do not know how much I could have made it without them so far.”

WHO'S COUNTING THE YEARS?

Jeff   Zuidema in his #42 car won the Pro Outlaw feature at Monadnock after a two year dry streak.
“It was not a bad night at all,” said Alexander.  “The car freed up. It was really good at the beginning and I knew it would get loose at the end.  When we had a long run, the other guys just ran away on me. I just held back, hoping that I had a shot with ten to go. It did not work out that way. You cannot win them all. The car was decent and the track had quite a bit of bite out there. We were loose but the track seemed pretty good. Compared to how we ran two weeks ago, the track was really great!”
Andy Seuss was persistent at Monadnock.
“We went all last year without a win. My crew and sponsors gave me a great limo to drive tonight.”

Jeff is one of the hottest pro stocks drivers in New England right now. He recently won back to back pro stock races at Thompson Speedway.

“My first thirty laps I had my rhythm and I got to run where I wanted to. I was watching what was happening behind me instead of watching what was in front of me. It has been a long time since I have led a race at Monadnock Speedway. I did not forget how to do it.  The drivers in this division drive clean and hard. They are great guys to race with. If we just keep doing what we are doing we will be all right.”

DEFENDING CHAMPION COMES IN THIRD

Still defending his 2005 TVMRS championship, Kirk Alexander drove a hard race coming in third place.
“It was not a bad night at all,” said Alexander.  “The car freed up. It was really good at the beginning and I knew it would get loose at the end.  When we had a long run, the other guys just ran away on me. I just held back, hoping that I had a shot with ten to go. It did not work out that way. You cannot win them all. The car was decent and the track had quite a bit of bite out there. We were loose but the track seemed pretty good. Compared to how we ran two weeks ago, the track was really great!”

There were a lot of cautions and cars that spun.

“There were a few guys getting out of control tonight. You just have to know who you can race with and who you cannot.”

So far this year, Kirk has maintained top 10 finishes with the #43 car except for the rained delayed races at Waterford. The next TVMS race is at Lee USA Speedway. 

“I am looking forward to going to Lee, it is a fun place. Tire management comes in very big at Lee.” 

ANOTHER TOP-10 FINISH FOR DACHENHAUSEN

After a long race and a great fourth place finish Ed Dachenhausen was helping the crew load up the race trailer. He gave some reflects on the night’s race.

Kirk Alexander (#43)
Hinkley's wounded #06. 
“Compared to a sharp stick in the eye the race was pretty real good I guess,” said Hinkley.  “It was a long tough night. It started out where we were just a little too free. It looked like you were going to have to do a lot of passing on the top of the track and we were a little too free on the top of the track. We were probably were good enough to be a top five car. With fifty to go there was not much behind us so we decided to come into the pit and try to make it a little better. We got back in and up to ninth place basically back to where we were before we pitted.   
“We started to come forward and then guys started wrecking in front of me again. Cars were getting into one another, changing lanes and spinning in front of us again. Same old story as always, we got into it again.  Like always. It was good track during the day but freed up a night. I do not know if it got greasy from all the divisions before us or not. It is a tough old race track. I am ready to go to Lee and go back at it.”

SEUSS STAYS POSITIVE

What a difference a race makes.  When we last left Andy Seuss and his #70 Rockingham Boat team at Waterford Speedbowl (CT), the 19-year-old driver saw the potential of a heat race victory and front row feature start turn sour when he got involved in an early wreck that caused major damage to his Modified.


Ed Dachenhausen (#48)
“All the stops and starts get tiring after a while,” said Dachenhausen.  “We changed the whole car for the feature. I was not happy with it in the heat races and we changed it around. We got it so it was turn really good in the beginning so I could make up a couple of spots. With everybody side by side it was easier picking. It started to get a little loose on us in the middle of the race and then it actually tightened right back up. This is not something I am use to but we are working on some stuff to get things better. I am happy with a top five after starting ninth.”
The race was filled with a lot of cautions and spins.

“We had it easier tonight coming up through the pack. You make up a couple of spots and then loose a couple of spots. There was an incident in turn two where all I saw was smoke. My spotter yelled there was a car stopped dead stopped there. I could not see. Jack Bateman could not see. We both checked up and three cars passed me. I then had to work my way back up again and get those three spots back. Hey what are you going to do, it is just racing.

“I just want to thank my mom and dad for getting me here every week. My crew who sweats hard to get the car ready every week in and out. They make it all good.”

A STICK IN THE EYE COULD ALWAYS BE WORSE

Les Hinkley had already changed from his race suit and was helping the crew load the car on the trailer mere moments after the fall of the checkered flag.  Who could blame him after such a tough night on the track.  Hinkley finished 11th, but the frustration was still kept in check by his sense of humor after the race.